Thursday, May 8, 2008

Random Question

Today I was thinking about an upcoming trip we have and all the little details I have to iron out about our flights...

And then I was thinking about the "liquid laws" airlines have in place now, and how I need to call the airline and just ask what exactly I should do with my insulin so that it's not awkward like it's been the last few times...

And then I realized I had a question for the Internets. So, Internets, what does a person with a pump do when going through the whole airport security scenario?

Yet another way changing to a pump might change the way your daily life flows. Hm. Food for thought: what other things will change and be either more difficult or less so that I haven't already thought about, assuming that someday in the next few years I get a pump?

Oh, and how the heck do young moms with pumps keep their kids from accidentally yanking the tubing out?

4 comments:

Scott said...

Technically, the rules require them to let you take insulin in with you, as it will freeze in the cargo area of the plane and therefore be destroyed. However, to pass through security, the FAA recommends a) making sure the insulin is in the original box (either for a vial or cartridges) and b) the vial must have a pharmacy's prescription label on or with it. Some insulin (regular for example) is non-prescription making that a challenge, but most retail (not mail-order) pharmacies will accommodate you if you ask.

Jimmie said...

After just traveling with my diabetic grandmother for the first time last month...we consulted the TSA website for the official rules...

Your medication does not have to have any kind of label or be in the original container. You would think they would force you do to so, but no, it is not a requirement. You just have to verbally declare to the TSA officer that you have diabetic supplies, including liquid medications and syringes. They may or may not choose to hand-inspect these items. (In DFW, they didn't care about my grandma's supplies. In FLL, they went through it with a fine-tooth comb, so who knows....)

You don't need any kind of special permission or containers or anything to bring medication (prescription or non), medical supplies, or baby food/formula/breastmilk onboard the plane. The thing is you just have to tell them you have it before they discover it themselves and think you are trying to sneak something on the plane. The TSA website is actually very helpful if you want to take a look at it.

Have fun! What are you guys' plans for OK? I'm still trying to iron out the details myself.

Jimmie said...

PS...I don't know if you got the comment I just posted or not because my computer locked up...but I went back and read your post and realized that no, in fact you were not asking for advice on how to travel with your insulin but rather on how to do so with an insulin pump. So, my bad. :-)

Kristin said...

I travel with my insulin pump all the time! No problems. Both for travel within and outside the USA, they are trained to recognize. Mine actually doesn't even set off the metal detector-- so I don't get searched. In fact, sometimes they go easy on me and give me that "I'm sorry that you have that strange thing attached to you" look! I also have never had my bag searched-- I guess they figure that I have a bunch of needles in there. Traveling is no trouble with the pump either!